1930 PENNY


Obverse:King GEORGE V - Design by Sir Edgar Bertram Mackennal.
Legend: GEORGIVS V D. G. BRITT: OMN: REX F. D. IND: IMP.
Reverse:Design by W. H. J. Blakemore.
Legend: ONE PENNY - COMMONWEALTH OF AUSTRALIA - 1930
Edge:Plain Edge.
Weight:9.45 grams (145.8 grains).
Size:30.8 mm (diameter).
Composition:Bronze - 97% Copper, 2.5% Zinc, 0.5% Tin
Mintage:Melbourne: Circulation: 1,500 - 3,000 (Estimated).
Proof - 6 known.
Mintmarks:None.

Valuation :
1930 PENNY

Very
Good
FineVery
Fine
Extra
Fine
Almost
Uncirc.
UncircBrilliant
Uncirc.
Proof
200213,00018,00016,00040,00075,000100,000150,000250,000

Notes:

Although not the rarest Australian numimatic item, the 1930 penny is the key coin to obtaining a full date set of Australian pre-decimal issues. The level of publicity associated with this popular coin has resulted in a demand which is continually pushing up the price. In many respects, the 1930 penny is a numismatic phenomenon - on the surface, the value of the coin appears to be well in excess of values which would normally be associated with a coin with over 1,500 known examples.

Officially, the 1930 penny was not minted. It is known from a long-serving employee who worked at the mint during the depression years that a small number of 1930 penny dies (possibly two) were produced, even though the decision not to mint the coin for circulation had been taken in late 1929. These dies were apparently set up in a coining press from time to time to demonstrate the coining process to visiting dignitaries. The visitors were offered one or two of the brand new coins in exchange for pennies from their pockets.

High quality forgeries of the 1930 penny exist. See the forgeries article for more information.

While unlikely, it is possible that two different obverse die varieties may have been used to produce 1930 pennies - the so called London and Indian dies. See the special article. Numismatic opinion about the authenticity of the London variety differs. Some dealers are adamant that all examples found so far have been identified as forgeries. The Canberra Mint's coin verification service has on record one example of a London variety 1930 penny which, at the time, apparently passed its tests for authenticity. This verification was subsequently withdrawn.

Source:
M. R. Roberts, Wynyard Coin Center, Sydney 1999.

On the reverse, the top part of the final leg of the N in ONE is the weakest part of the design. To some extent, all 1930 pennies exhibit this weakness. Collectors will pay a premium for examples which display a strong strike in this area of the design.

Of the six known proof examples of the 1930 penny, three are in private hands. The remaining three are in public collections in the Museum of Victoria, the National Gallery of South Australia and the British Museum in London.

In 1999, the Canberra mint released a .999 Silver Ten Cents frosted proof coin with a reverse design of the 1930 Penny as part of a six coin Masterpieces in Silver set.


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